Bookmark and Share

Not Circumcised - Can I Still Have Sex?

Published: September 13, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,
My penis foreskin is there and it doesn't show my penis head it all. It's totally covered when flaccid and erect. Can I still have sex like this ? I'm scared to do the stretches
Signed: Not Circumcised - Can I Still Have Sex?

Dear Not Circumcised - Can I Still Have Sex?,

Foreskin overlying the tip of the penis (glans penis) can occur for a few reasons. To have a better sense of why this is the case, it is helpful to know whether it was always present or recently occurred. For example, if the penis was not circumcised at birth, then the foreskin was never removed and remains in its natural state overlying the glans penis.

However, even with uncircumcised and circumcised males, the foreskin can be difficult to retract leading to a condition call phimosis. Phimosis is the inability to retract the foreskin due to adhesions of the foreskin to the glans penis. This is normal from childhood and as the penis grows and gets erect, the adhesions dissolve and the foreskin retracts.

However, phimosis can become problematic in cases when the foreskin was able to retract previously from birth without issues but now does not retract with erection. This can be seen in cases where there was previous infection or inflammation of the skin of the glans penis causing scarring and the foreskin to adhere to the glans penis. With phimosis, it is NOT recommended to forcefully retract the foreskin because it can form a tight seal around the glans penis and lead to pain with erection.

In uncircumcised penises and with phimosis of circumcised penises, it is still possible to have sexual intercourse.  However, the glans penis will still be covered. If you start to experience symptoms of pain with erection, difficulty urinating or having a normal urine stream with urinating (dribbling instead of a steady stream) and swelling of the penis, it is important to seek medical attention in which the foreskin can be surgically removed from the tip of the penis to relieved pressure. 

Given that this is a concern for you, and because TeenHealthFX cannot make any kind of definitive diagnosis over the web, FX recommends that you discuss this with your primary care physician or an adolescent medicine specialist. Your doctor can get more information about the history of the problem and current symptoms, and then can make recommendations on how to best address the situation. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

Ratings