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Got My Period and Pregnancy Test Came Back Negative, But Could I Still Be Pregnant?

Published: December 14, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,
Is it possible I could be pregnant? I had sex 6 times unprotected, however he did not ejaculate inside of me, or pre-ejaculate - I do not know this for sure, however he said that he did not as he would have felt it and he can control it. My period came 2 weeks later on the exact date it was due on, however I still am unsure whether I am pregnant or not. 4 days before my period I took a cheap supermarket pregnancy test and it was negative. I have been feeling sick some of the time, I have gone off all food, now and again my whole back aches, and I have been feeling more tired than usual, I also have been getting very lightheaded - however this may be down to me not eating. Is there a possibility?
Signed: Got my Period and My Pregnancy Test Came Back Negative, But Could I Still Be Pregnant?

Dear Got my Period and My Pregnancy Test Came Back Negative, But Could I Still Be Pregnant?,

If you did get your menstrual period after having unprotected sex, then you would not be pregnant. However, if you have had unprotected sex since having your period it is possible you could be pregnant.

If you are concerned you could be pregnant, the best thing would be to take a pregnancy test on your own or meet with your doctor so that he/she could perform a pregnancy test and/or blood test to determine if you are pregnant or not. Keep in mind that while some pregnancy tests can give accurate results within a few days before an expected period, they are most accurate when taken after a missed period. For example, to take a pregnancy test 4 days before a missed period could result in a false negative. If you do decide to take a pregnancy test prior to the day you are expecting your period, it is always best to repeat the test after a missed period to verify the results.

TeenHealthFX would also like you to be aware of and consider the following:

  • Men, especially young men who are not sexually experienced, are not always aware of when they ejaculate during intercourse and often do have trouble controlling when they ejaculate (which is one of several reasons why the withdrawal method is not recommended for teens and young adults).
  • There are physical symptoms that can be associated with pregnancy, but physical symptoms such as fatigue and stomach issues can also be associated with stress and anxiety.
  • It would be helpful for you to look at the links in our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex so you can learn about sexual readiness, how pregnancy happens, STDs, birth control, pregnancy tests, emergency contraception and more. The more you educate yourself about these issues, the more you can make decisions to prevent yourself from dealing with pregnancy scares or the possible transmission of STDs.
  • If you are going to continue to be sexually active, it would be helpful for you to meet with your primary care physician, gynecologist or adolescent medicine specialist so you can discuss any questions or concerns you may have about your sexual health. It is also very important for you not to have unprotected sex anymore. When you meet with your doctor, please discuss the best birth control methods for you, as doctors generally recommend that sexually active teens use condoms each and every time they have sex along with a back-up method of birth control such as the birth control pill or birth control shot.

 

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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