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Why Did My First Pregnancy Test Say 'Positive' and the Rest Said 'Negative'?

Published: December 20, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,
okay so me and my boyfriend were messing around one day, (we are both virgins) and it was about 2 weeks after i had gotten my last period (which was November 11, 2016 and it lasted 6 days) and we both were wondering how it felt to put it in. so he went to the bathroom and reassured me he did not masturbate prior that day, so there was no worry of pre-cum. so he put it in like halfway for about 30 seconds but it hurt me too much so we stopped and i started bleeding because i was very dry and he was neither hard or wet and i had some tearing from the pain. well ever since then i have been freaking out worried about pregnancy. i was freaking out so much that i had my boyfriend buy me a pack of two Clearblue pregnancy tests to ease my worries. i took the first one this past wednesday around 3 p.m. (im not due to get my next period until this coming monday and i am irregular) and to my horrific surprise i looked down at the test to see "pregnant". i was shocked and asked myself how this was even possible. so after i was done taking it i read the instructions to take the test and realized i did them wrong. i saturated the test strip in pee, and let it sit uncovered in a public restroom. so i took the other test from that same box later that night and made sure to follow the instructions correctly and it came out "not pregnant". this made me feel a little better but not a lot. so i had him buy me a box of three more tests from EPT and i took one of those yesterday and one today and both said "not pregnant" with me following the instructions correctly on both. i am just concerned and i want answers for why the first one said "pregnant" and if that is still possible??
Signed: Why Did My First Pregnancy Test Say 'Positive' and the Rest Said 'Negative'?

Dear Why Did My First Pregnancy Test Say 'Positive' and the Rest Said 'Negative'?,

While it is not very common to have a false positive pregnancy test, it is possible. By false positive we mean that the test read positive, but you are not actually pregnant. One of the most common reasons for a false positive pregnancy test is the improper use of a pregnancy test. Other reasons can include the use of an expired pregnancy test, urine that is contaminated with soap, detergent or blood, or the use of certain medications. Since you said that you read the instructions of the first test incorrectly, then that is the most likely reason you had an initial false positive. However, if you find you are feeling very anxious about this you could always meet with a medical health professional to confirm the results of the later tests so that you can put your mind at ease.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

 

Some information to consider for the future:

To avoid a false positive test result:

  • Follow the directions on the pregnancy test carefully.
  • Wait until after your missed period to take a pregnancy test.
  • Take more than one test and use different brands.
  • Always confirm results with a medical professional.  

 

To help avoid pregnancy scares in the future speak to your doctor about the best birth control methods for you if you are going to continue to be sexually active. Doctors generally recommend that teens and young adults use condoms each and every time they have sex to protect against unwanted pregnancies and the transmission of STIs, as well as a back-up method of birth control such as the pill or birth control shot. Your doctor will be able to make the best recommendations for you.

To avoid unwanted pregnancies and the transmission of STIs it is also important to be educated about various sexual health topics. That said, TeenHealthFX recommends that you and your boyfriend read our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex so that you can learn about sexual readiness, birth control, STIs, emergency contraception, how pregnancy happens and more.

TeenHealthFX would also like you to be aware that not having masturbated the day before does not guarantee the absence of pre-ejaculatory fluids (sometimes referred to as “pre-cum”). There is sperm in pre-ejaculatory fluids which can cause pregnancy, so it is best to use condoms during intercourse (the whole time!), as well as a back-up method of birth control.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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