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Could I Be Pregnant Even Though I've Had My Period Twice?

Published: December 14, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,

please help!! i had sex about two months ago. i used a condom that didnt break and i was on birth control but i did miss one or two pills throughout the pack. ive gotten my period twice since but i know you can still get your period while pregnant even though its rare. ive been freaking out recently because ive been experiencing symptoms such as swollen breasts nausea and just about every other pregnancy symptom after i learn that its a symptom. i feel bloated but i cant tell if that's because birth control, pms (its supposed to start towards the end of this week), or if im tricking myself into thinking im having symptoms. i know anxiety can cause my stomach to be upset. these symptoms have been occurring for a while even a week after i had sex which i know is unlikely to experience so many symptoms that early. am i just freaking myself out or is it a good possibility? please help ive been worried about this for quite some time.

Signed: Could I Be Pregnant Even Though I Have Had My Period Twice?

Dear Could I Be Pregnant Even Though I Have Had My Period Twice?,

While missing a day or two of the birth control pill can decrease the effectiveness of the pill, you said you also used a condom during sex that did not break. Given the use of the condom, and, most importantly, the fact that you have had your period twice since having sex, TeenHealthFX cannot imagine how you could be pregnant from having sex two months ago. However, if you are still concerned about this and simply need to put your mind at ease, consider taking a pregnancy test so that you can feel less anxious and less stressed about the whole thing.

The one point you made that TeenHealthFX would like to address is your comment that it is possible, though rare, to be pregnant and have your period. This is actually NOT possible. Menstrual flow related to a period consists partially of an unfertilized egg and the lining of the uterus. It is not possible to be pregnant (since being pregnant means that a fertilized egg will attach itself to the uterine lining) and have menstrual flow that is releasing an unfertilized egg and uterine lining. Some women may experience a minimal amount of bleeding or spotting while pregnant. But this is generally lighter than a regular period and definitely doesn’t happen for all women. If a pregnant woman does find herself bleeding heavily it could be that she is having a miscarriage. So there are reasons why some (or a lot of) blood might be present for a pregnant woman, but it is not because that pregnant woman is having a menstrual period.   

Moving forward, FX would like you to consider the following:

  • If you have any concerns about taking the pill every day, discuss with your prescribing doctor whether an alternate method of birth control might be better for you, such as the birth control shot.
  • Continue to use condoms in addition to any other birth control method you are using. Condoms will provide additional protection against unwanted pregnancies, as well as protection against the transmission of STDs, which birth control methods such as the pill or shot do not provide.
  • Check out our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex to learn about sexual readiness, how pregnancy happens, birth control, STDs, pregnancy tests, emergency contraception and more.
  • Remember that while there are definitely physical symptoms that are associated with being pregnant, there are also physical symptoms that can be associated with feeling stressed and anxious. When we are stressed or anxious, we might be hyperaware of things in our body we wouldn’t have noticed otherwise. And we might experience symptoms such as an upset stomach or feeling nauseous.

 

If you have any other questions or concerns, check in with your primary care physician, gynecologist or adolescent medicine specialist. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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