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Implant Birth Control With IUD?

Published: March 01, 2014
Dear TeenHealthFX,

can you get the implant birth control when you already have the iud?"


Dear Implant Birth Control With IUD?,

You can switch from on form of birth control to the other but there would be no reason to use them both at the same time. They are 2 different methods of birth control that are considered very effect. Implant contraception involves inserting a rod under the skin. The rod releases into the bloodstream tiny amounts of the hormone progestin. The intrauterine device (IUD) is a small plastic T-shaped device that is inserted into the uterus. An IUD's contraceptive action begins as soon as the device is placed in the uterus.  If you wanted to switch to implant contraception then your doctor would remove the IUD. It is not that it is a dangerous combination but there is no real benefit to having both verses the possible side effects of each method. Your best bet is to consult your doctor and get his/her opinion about what option is right for you. 

You may be interested to know the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recently made the recommendation that teenage girls considering contraception should opt for hormonal implants or IUDS first over more traditional methods. The group was not against teen girls using the pill if they want to avoid pregnancy. Their reasoning was that since birth control pills often must be taken at the very same time every day to be most potent and forgetting to take even one can lead to pregnancy. As a result the pill is usually only rated  around 90 percent effective. 

A recent study in a May issue of the New England Journal of Medicine found that compared to women using IUDs, unplanned pregnancies were 20 times more likely among women taking birth control pills, the patch or ring. For women under 21, the risk for unplanned pregnancy when using the pill, patch or ring doubled that of risk for older women. 

The IUD and implant can cost hundreds of dollars but the new health reform law requires health insurance plans to cover birth control without co-payments.  Publicly funded health clinics are able to offer birth control free or at a reduced cost. 

No matter what form of birth control is used; a condom should still be used at all times. Birth control methods do not protect against AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STD.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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