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Questions On 1st Time With Sex & Reversing Condoms

Published: May 14, 2012
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I have a few questions about sex: *note: I am 16 years old, and my boyfriend and I have been dating for 8 months* 1. My boyfriend and I were trying to have sex, and he goes to put a condom on, but realizes that he's putting it on the wrong way, so then he reverses it and puts it on right. Could you get pregnant from the outside of the condom touching his penis, and then the penis going into the vagina? 2. How much do you bleed when you have sex for the first time? 3. Do you have agonizing pain when having sex for the first time? Or something less painful than agonizing?
Signed: Questions On 1st Time With Sex & Reversing Condoms

Dear Questions On 1st Time With Sex & Reversing Condoms,

 

1.      If your boyfriend had the condom on, took the condom off and reversed it because it was originally put on inside out it is possible for pregnancy to occur. Even if your boyfriend hadn’t ejaculated in the condom, he could easily have emitted pre-ejaculatory fluids (which do contain sperm) into the condom. Once the condom was reversed, that pre-ejaculatory fluid would then be on the outside of the condom and would come into contact with your vagina during intercourse. FX would recommend that if the condom is put on incorrectly in the future, that you simply start with a new one. FX also recommends speaking to your primary care physician, gynecologist, or adolescent medicine specialist about the use of birth control pills as a back-up method of birth control.

2.      You can bleed when you have sex for the first time and the hymen is broken. But you shouldn’t bleed very heavily or for more than a day or two. If you have very heavy bleeding, bleed for more than a day or two, or experience any other problematic physical symptoms, see your healthcare provider.

3.      It is possible for a woman to experience some degree of mild pain or mild discomfort the very first time she has sex – but you should not be in agonizing pain. If you are in agonizing pain consider that your partner may be a little too rough during the intercourse and needs to proceed more gently, that you may be feeling very tense or nervous causing your muscles to tighten and penetration to be more difficult, you may need some additional lubricant to reduce any irritation from the friction (remember to use water-based lubricants with condoms), or there is some underlying problem that requires a visit to the doctor for an evaluation. If you are experiencing any kind of exceptional pain, stop what you are doing and assess what might be contributing to the pain you are experiencing.

 

As always, when it comes to being sexually active, make sure that you are truly ready for sex and that you are educated about birth control information and the transmission of STDs.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-6475 for an appointment or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

 

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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