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Took Plan B - Could I Be Pregnant And How Will It Affect My Cycle?

Published: March 17, 2014
Dear Took Plan B - Could I Be Pregnant And How Will It Affect My Cycle?,

I have been taking birth control pills since August and have been pretty good about taking them. I had unprotected sex with my boyfriend about a week ago and took plan B the next day because I missed a couple pills that month. How will it effect my menstrual cycle and what are the chances I could be pregnant?


Dear Took Plan B - Could I Be Pregnant And How Will It Affect My Cycle?,

Plan B, also known as the emergency contraceptive pill is a hormone pill that will prevent a pregnancy from occurring if it has not occurred already. It is not an abortion pill. It has to be taken as close to the time of unprotected sex as possible up to 72 hours in order for it to be the most effective. If you took plan B within that 72 hour window after unprotected sex, the chances of you being pregnant are less likely, however, if you do not get your period within 3 weeks of taking it or show any signs of pregnancy (frequent urination, headaches, fatigue, missed period, nausea, tender breasts) you should take an at home pregnancy test and schedule an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible.

There are some side effects to taking plan B, which include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, headaches and irregular period that can occur after taking it. It can affect your menstrual cycle and cause spotting, irregular bleeding that is not your period, or early or late period to happen. Since it was a one-time occurrence for you taking plan B, it should not affect the periods that come after this month. 

You should not rely on plan B as your primary method of birth control. If you are having difficulty remembering to take the pill every day, you should see your doctor to discuss other methods of birth control such as the patch or the ring that do not require you to take a pill every day. Also, even while taking the birth control pill regularly you should always use condoms as a back-up method of birth control and to protect you from STD's. 

TeenHealthFX definitely recommends discussing your concerns and questions with the doctor prescribing your pills. And if you ever have questions about your sexual health, be sure to speak to your primary care physician, gynecologist or adolescent medicine specialist. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-6475 for an appointment or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network provider. 

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