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What Is The Pimple-Like Thing On My Labia?

Published: May 31, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I have what looks like a pImple on my Labia. It does not itch but when i touch it, it hurts. I am a virgin and i do not believe that it is an ingrown hair because i do not shave,I only do the accasional trim.
Signed: What Is The Pimple-Like Thing On My Labia?

Dear What Is The Pimple-Like Thing On My Labia?,

There are several causes of bumps or pimples on the female genitalia. Most of them are not contagious, not life threatening and not STDs. Here are some possibilities of bumps that can occur on the female genitalia:

  • Cysts are common and can occur anywhere on the body. In the vulva they can often arise from a blocked skin gland. They often look like pimples or lumps under the skin.
  • Blocked hair follicles is probably the most common bump seen in the genitalia of men and women.
  • Clogged sweat glands can also occur anywhere on the body.
  • Genital herpes is an STD. It usually causes itchy, burning and painful lesions that often start as a sore spot resembling a bug bite, but progresses over a few days to a blister or group of blisters and then an open ulcer.
  • Infection with subtypes 6 or 11 of the human papilloma virus (HPV) can cause genital warts. It too is a sexually transmitted disease. These "bumps" have a cauliflower like appearance. They are rough to the touch and can spread.
  • Molluscum contagiosum. This viral infection causes small, fleshy bumps on the vulva with a central indentation. They have a pearly color to them. They usually go away without treatment. 
  • Skin tags are fleshy irregular shaped growths of normal skin that can occur on the vulva or elsewhere on the body.

 

There are a multitude of other causes of female genital bumps. While most are minor and require little or limited treatment, others are STDs and/or do require treatment. Since you have not yet been sexually active, it is fairly safe to say that it is not an STD. However, since you have a “bump” that is concerning you, it would be a good idea to get it checked out by a doctor so you can be properly diagnosed and so that you can receive any needed treatment – especially if the bump is getting worse, getting bigger or causing you pain.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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