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I Can't Find My Clitoris

Published: July 19, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,
Hello. I am 14 years old. I'm a girl. I just learned about the clitoris in class a few weeks ago. I have been exploring my vagina for a about a week now and I can't find my clitoris. I can't orgasm either. Sometimes other girls in class talk about it. Please help me find it, nothing on Google has helped me out yet.
Signed: I Can't Find My Clitoris

Dear I Can't Find My Clitoris,

To help you identify the various parts of the female sex organs, take a look at the diagrams on Info for Teens section of the Planned Parenthood website. If you click on the arrows under the “Internal View” and “External View” of the vagina, it will show you the various parts, including where the clitoris is.

You can also click on the Planned Parenthood webpage Female Anatomy: Vulva, Vagina, and Breasts to learn about the vulva, labia, clitoris and breasts. The information provided about the clitoris on the website is as follows:

The clitoris is a part of your vulva that's devoted purely to sexual pleasure. It becomes swollen when you're aroused (aka "turned on" or "horny"). Only the tip of the clitoris can be seen at the top of vulva — the rest is hidden under a part of the labia called the clitoral hood. 

The tip of the clitoris varies in size from smaller than a pea to bigger than a lima bean. The rest of the clitoris is inside the body, and is about five inches long. The sensitivity of the clitoris is different from person to person.

The clitoris is a pretty cool body part. Like the penis, it becomes firmer and swollen during sexual arousal. Unlike the penis, the clitoris' only purpose is for sexual pleasure. It doesn't play a part in making babies like penises and vaginas do. The clitoris is basically there just to make you feel good. And it's often SUPER sensitive: the clitoris has thousands of nerve endings in it!

While the clitoris is made for pleasure, for a lot of people it can be too sensitive to touch directly. Masturbation can help you figure out for yourself how you like to be touched, and later you can tell anyone you have sex with what you like and don't like.

 

If you ever have any questions regarding your body or sexual health, you can speak to your primary care physician, gynecologist or adolescent medicine specialist. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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