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Pain in Vagina Since I Had Sex

Published: February 28, 2017
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I recently looked at one of the questions someone asked and I am going through the same thing but it did not help on how I should treat it. I recently had sex and the day after sex my vagina started to hurt. It was a burning sensation as I peed and sometimes nothing out come out other times it was very little liquid. A professional on this sight said that it could have been that my vagina got irritated and my partner was thrusting too hard and that there wasn't enough lubrication. I do think that is the case because I did feel the condom very dry and it was a little painful during intercourse. This is the I think the 5th day with the same pain. It does go away for most of the day at times then comes back. I thought I was getting better because Thursday o didn't feel as much pain and the same on Friday. But today that is now Saturday the pain came back as if it was Tuesday. I also noticed that today blood seems to be coming out as well and I don't know weather it is my period on it's way or something haveing. To do with the trusting sex. I don't know what to do.
Signed: Pain in Vagina Since I Had Sex

Dear Pain in Vagina Since I Had Sex,

There are a few possibilities as to what is causing the pain, bleeding and urges to urinate with little or nothing coming out. You could be dealing with any of the below issues or some combination of them:

  • First time having sex. If this was your first time having sex it is possible that you have been experiencing the discomfort, soreness and spotting that can occur for women after having sex for the first time. However, any discomfort, soreness or spotting should not last very long.
  • Not enough lubrication. If there was not enough lubrication during sex, that could have caused vaginal irritation.
  • An allergy to the specific type of condom that was used.
  • Urinary tract infection (UTI). According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms of a UTI can include: a strong, persistent urge to urinate; a burning sensation when urinating; passing frequent, small amounts of urine; urine that appears cloudy; urine that appears red, bright pink or cola-colored — a sign of blood in the urine; strong-smelling urine; pelvic pain, in women — especially in the center of the pelvis and around the area of the pubic bone
  • Bladder infections. Bladder infections are more common in women and can occur after having sex. Symptoms can include cloudy or bloody urine, urinating more often than usual, bad-smelling urine, pain or burning while urinating, frequent urges to urinate, and cramping, pressure or pain in the lower abdomen or back. Bladder infections are easily treated when diagnosed right away, but serious complications can result from an untreated bladder infection.

 

As for whether or not the bleeding is your period, did the bleeding start when you were expecting your period? And is the amount of blood the same as it is usually is when you get your period? In the future TeenHealthFX recommends that you start to keep track of your period by writing down the first day you start bleeding at the beginning of each period so you know when to expect your period each month.

TeenHealthFX listed some possibilities of what is going on above, however, we cannot know exactly what is going on so we do recommend that you reach out to a trusted adult. You can go to your school nurse or you could ask a guidance counselor or teacher who you trust. You could also meet with your primary care physician, gynecologist or an adolescent medicine specialist. It is important for you to find out exactly what is going on. Especially because a UTI will not get better on its own and a bladder infection could cause other problems if it is not treated.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

TeenHealthFX would also like to make sure that you are making healthy decisions for yourself when it comes to being sexually active. For one thing, we want you to think about whether or not you feel truly ready to be having sex at this point in your life. We also want you to speak to a doctor about back-up birth control to use with condoms, such as the pill or birth control shot. You can check out the links in our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex to learn about sexual readiness, how pregnancy happens, STDs, birth control, pregnancy tests, emergency contraception and more. The more you know about these topics the more can protect your emotional and physical health when it comes to being physically intimate with others.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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