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Concerns About My Right Testicle

Published: November 17, 2014
Dear Concerns About My Right Testicle,

I am a 16 year old male, I have been masturbating since about the age of 11, I am a virgin but I masturbate daily. Recently in the past couple of days I have been trying to masturbate but I can't climax or ejaculate, I just lose the feeling all of a sudden. This scares me quite a bit since in past years I noticed some strange things about my right testicle. The right side of scrotum tends to sometimes swell up or inflate to twice or three times the size of the left side. I have never had any pain in the right side of my scrotum or testicle. My right testicle sometimes slides out of the scrotum up above the penis when an object is pressed up against my scrotum. Again, I have never experienced any pain in my testicle or scrotum before. My parents don't exactly approve of masturbation and I don't know what to tell them and I do not plan for them to ever find out. Over the years I have been too embarrassed to tell a doctor and too afraid that he would tell my parents I'm masturbating daily. I don't know if these issues are related but please help.


Dear Concerns About My Right Testicle,

It seems that there are several issues going on here. TeenHealthFX will try to address each one individually.  They may or may not all be related. But we will start off by saying the fact that you are not having any pain in your testicle is a good thing. 

In terms of your inability to ejaculate or climax there are several reasons why this may be happening. Physical conditions that cause delayed ejaculation include certain medications, infections, excessive alcohol consumption, hormone-related conditions, drug use, injuries to the pelvic nerves, and certain diseases such as diabetes. Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include depression, anxiety, relationship concerns, stress, poor communication, performance anxiety, cultural or religious taboos, and discrepancies between fantasy and reality during sex. Think about whether any of these physical or psychological risk factors for delayed ejaculation apply to you, and if so, talk to your healthcare provider or a counselor for more information and treatment.

In terms of your testicle riding up above your scrotum, it’s not out of the ordinary for this to happen.  The cremaster muscle, which is a pouch that surrounds your testicles and will elevate them or let them hang lower depending on the situation, will pull your testicles up if aroused or startled.  If you are pressing your testicles against something, or you accidentally do and are startled, this could cause your cremaster muscle to pull your testicles up.  Sometimes people have an overactive cremaster muscle and it pulls them all the way up into your groin.  This is called retractile testicle, and may explain what is happening to you. The health effects of this condition are not well known, but males with retractile testicle may be more vulnerable to testicular cancer, fertility problems, testicular torsion (twisting of the cord that connects the testicle to the groin), and damage caused by pressure against the pubic bone. However, if a retractile testicle isn't painful and it lowers back into place relatively soon, there's probably no cause for alarm. 

The scrotal swelling could be because of several different causes.  This could be because of a hernia, which is when fatty or intestinal tissues push through the inguinal canal.  The inguinal canal is located at the base of the abdomen and the testes descend through it shortly before birth. The canal is closed, but sometimes due to defects tissues can push through.  This could also be due to a hydrocele which is a buildup of fluid around the testicles.  Painless swelling of the testicles could be because of more serious things like testicular cancer. 

All of these concerns are something you should talk to your doctor about.  Masturbation is a normal, healthy part of life and it shouldn’t be something you are ashamed of.  TeenHealthFX understands your not being comfortable talking to your parents about it, but you should definitely try and talk to your doctor about it.  Your doctor will not judge you or make you uncomfortable for asking those questions.  Doctors are obligated to keep anything you discuss with them confidential unless they are concerned you are going to hurt yourself or others.  They wouldn’t discuss masturbation or any of these concerns with your parents unless you asked them to.  In addition, these are concerns that your doctor should be aware of in case there is something more serious going on. 

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

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