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Got My Period Twice, But Could I Still Be Pregnant?

Published: June 20, 2017
Dear TeenHealthFX,
Hey. I have some concerns and worries I cannot get rid of. About almost 3 months ago, I had protected sex, and I'm not taking the pill. I began to worry and talked to my nurse. Later I got my period, as I expected. Then, we took a preg test and it came back negative. Then I got my period again the next month as normal.. But still cannot help but feel extreme anguish and I regret having sex so much, I don't think I ever want to do it again. Could I be pregnant? My nurse says I'm not but I still don't know.
Signed: Got My Period Twice, But Could I Still Be Pregnant?

Dear Got My Period Twice, But Could I Still Be Pregnant?,

Given that you have had your period twice since having sex, you would not currently be pregnant. When a woman gets her period it is because the egg released from that woman’s ovary was not fertilized and implanted in the uterus, resulting in the shedding of the uterine lining. You also took a pregnancy test after you got your period, which was negative, so that is even more evidence that you are not pregnant. And you have discussed all of this with a nurse, who would certainly be able to catch something if there was a concern.

If you had sex since your last period, particularly if you had unprotected sex since your last period, then pregnancy would be possible. But it does not sound like you have been sexually active since having sex 3 months ago.

TeenHealthFX appreciates that you are experiencing quite a bit of anxiety about the possibility of being pregnant, but it sounds like the underlying feelings are more about your decision to have sex. Having a mixed emotional reaction about this is completely normal. Having sex is a big decision in terms of the possibility of pregnancy or STD transmission, emotional readiness, and personal, religious or cultural beliefs about it. Given how you have been feeling, it is very possible that you were simply not ready for sex. While you obviously can’t go back and undo what was done, it would be helpful for you to think about how truly ready you are to be sexually active so you can decide what you want to do from this point on. In making this decision, it might be helpful to speak to a trusted adult about it, such as a parent or the nurse you have been in contact with. You can also read the TeenHealthFX Hot Topic, When Am I Ready for Sex?, the Planned Parenthood article, Am I Ready for Sex?, and the TeensHealth article, Virginity: A Very Personal Decision.

At whatever point you do decide that you are ready to be sexually active, TeenHealthFX would like to encourage you to speak to your doctor about safer sex precautions. Doctors generally recommend that teens and young adults who choose to be sexually active use condoms each and every time they have sex to protect against unwanted pregnancies and the transmission of STDs, as well as a back-up method of birth control such as the pill or birth control shot. Your doctor can make the best recommendations for you and discuss with you how to use properly use birth control to maximize its effectiveness.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. A Planned Parenthood health center is a good option if you have concerns about cost or confidentiality issues. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

FX also suggests that you check out the links in our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex so that you can learn about sexual readiness, how pregnancy happens, pregnancy tests, emergency contraception, birth control, STDs and more. The more educated you are about these topics, the more likely you will make healthy decisions for yourself when it comes to your sexual health.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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