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Not Sure if My Boyfriend is the Father of My Baby?

Published: July 10, 2017
Dear TeenHealthFX,
I'm currently with someone but had sex with someone else right before getting together So I got my monthly march 3 an it was an actual period so stating that If I had sex in the end of February and found out in April that I was pregnant and counting back it states my first week of pregnancy was The second week in march I did have sex wit my boyfriend the first and second week of march during and after my period does that mean the guy right before my boyfriend is the father or is my boyfriend?
Signed: Not Sure if My Boyfriend is the Father of My Baby?

Dear Not Sure if My Boyfriend is the Father of My Baby?,

If TeenHealthFX is understanding your question correctly, it sounds like you had sex with this other person in February before you got your last period on March 3rd, and then had sex with your boyfriend during and after your period on March 3rd. If you did get your menstrual period March 3rd and only had sex with this other person before that date, then he would not be the father of your child because if you had gotten pregnant from having sex with him in February, you would not have had a menstrual period in March.

However, it possible that TeenHealthFX is misunderstanding the situation or is missing some important information so please speak with your doctor about this so that he/she can get all the needed information to help you determine who the father is.

While TeenHealthFX can absolutely appreciate how important it is for you to know who your baby’s father is, it is also extremely important for you to be receiving prenatal care to ensure the health of you and your baby. You have different pregnancy options that you can discuss with a healthcare provider, but regardless of whether you keep the baby or give the baby up for adoption, getting this care right now definitely needs to be top priority.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. A Planned Parenthood health center is a good option if you have concerns about cost or confidentiality issues. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network OBGYNs (Obstetrician-Gynecologists).

TeenHealthFX would also like to encourage you to speak to your doctor about safer sex precautions for the future after you have your baby. Doctors generally recommend that teens and young adults who choose to be sexually active use condoms each and every time they have sex to protect against unwanted pregnancies and the transmission of STDs, as well as a back-up method of birth control such as the pill or birth control shot. Your doctor can make the best recommendations for you and discuss with you how to use properly use birth control to maximize its effectiveness.

FX also suggests that you check out the links in our Resource of the Month: Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex so that you can learn about sexual readiness, how pregnancy happens, pregnancy tests, emergency contraception, birth control, STDs and more. The more educated you are about these topics, the more likely you will make healthy decisions for yourself when it comes to your sexual health.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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