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Could I Still Have Pre Cum

Published: September 30, 2013
Dear TeenHealthFX,

My girlfriend and I have only had sex two times in which case both were without a condom. The first time was 4 weeks ago and the second time was 2 weeks ago. I never came during either times and wasn't even close. Could I still have had pre-cum? My girlfriend said she had her period a few days before our fist time and she had it again 2 weeks after. she hasn't had her cherry popped until me. Does that explain the bleeding? She says her breast have been hurting and that she's been having head aches and now today she's had stomach aches. Is she pregnant?


Dear Could I Still Have Pre Cum,

TeenHealthFX can’t say if your girlfriend is pregnant or not but we can tell you from your actions that it is possible. Pre-ejaculatory fluid is the liquid that oozes out of the penis during sexual excitement before ejaculation occurs. Pre-ejaculatory fluids contain a small amount of sperm which can cause pregnancy and men are generally not aware of exactly when they are emitting these fluids – so it is definitely possible to become pregnant when having unprotected sex, even if ejaculation does not occur. The cherry refers to the Hymen - a ring of tissue surrounding the vaginal opening, but not covering it completely. So “cherry popped" refers to the hymen breaking and the bleeding that may occur (but does not have to) after sexual intercourse.

Engaging in sexual activity comes with a responsibility that involves protecting yourself from unwanted pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD’s.) You could get a home pregnancy test to determine if your girlfriend is pregnant but TeenHealthFX strongly recommends that you follow up with a medical professional. Not only will they test for pregnancy but they can talk to you about practicing safer sex and choosing an appropriate birth control method.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-6475 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

 

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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