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A Few Serious Sex Questions

Published: June 28, 2016
Dear TeenHealthFX,
Hi I am 17 yrs old and male. I have a few serious sex questions. 1. (3 parts) Can you get a girl pregnant through raw anal sex? What if she is ovulating at that that time? What exactly is ovulation? 2. (2 parts) Is it safe for a girl to take birth control, have raw sex, and then take an emergency contraceptive? Would that be like maximum pregnancy prevention if it is safe and she is not ovulating? 3. (Just 1 part) If ovulation means what I think it means, does that mean that having raw vaginal sex wont cause pregnancy if she isn't ovulating?
Signed: A Few Serious Sex Questions

Dear A Few Serious Sex Questions,

TeenHealthFX is going to answer your questions assuming that by “raw” sex you are referring to unprotected sex (sex without the use of a condom).

Question 1:

You cannot get pregnant from anal sex. However, there is a bigger chance of getting STDs, including HIV, from unprotected anal sex. That said, it is important to always use condoms and lubricant during anal sex to decrease the risk of STDs. Do not use oil-based lubricants such as Vaseline, lotion or baby oil as these can damage condoms. You can buy safe lubricants in the condom aisle at drug stores and grocery stores.

Ovulation is the time when an ovary releases an egg. Ovulation usually happens about two weeks before a woman’s next period would take place. The egg enters a fallopian tube and starts moving toward the uterus. A woman’s chance of becoming pregnant increases right before and during the time when she is ovulating. Keep in mind that avoiding sex only during ovulation is not an effective method of birth control since pregnancy technically can occur following unprotected sex at any point during a woman’s menstrual cycle, as well as the fact that ovulation is harder to predict in teens and young adults because menstrual cycles are often more irregular.

Question 2:

If a woman is taking birth control pills as prescribed, she should not need to take emergency contraception following sex. If she has forgotten pills or is not taking the pill as recommended and has unprotected sex, then it could be recommended to take emergency contraception. The best thing to do would be to contact the doctor prescribing the birth control, explain the situation, and get his/her recommendation on whether EC is advisable. Keep in mind that EC needs to be taken within 120 hours following unprotected sex, and the closer it is taken to having had unprotected sex, the more effective it will be.

The only 100% way of preventing unwanted pregnancies is abstinence. If you choose to be sexually active, doctors recommend using condoms to protect against unwanted pregnancies and the spread of STDs, as well as a back-up method of birth control such as the pill or birth control shot. Your doctor can discuss the best birth control methods for you.

Question 3:

There is a higher chance of pregnancy when there is unprotected sex right before and during ovulation. But that absolutely does not mean that pregnancy cannot occur if you have unprotected sex at other times during a woman’s menstrual cycle. For one thing, pregnancy can occur if you have unprotected sex anytime during a woman’s menstrual cycle. Second, it is difficult to determine when ovulation is about to occur or is occurring in teens and young adults because the menstrual cycle can often be irregular during these years.

According to TeensHealth: Fertility awareness is not a reliable way to prevent pregnancy for most teens. Over the course of 1 year, as many as 25 out of 100 typical couples who rely on fertility awareness to prevent pregnancy will have an accidental pregnancy. That is a pretty big risk to take!

 

For more information you can read about How Pregnancy Happens and Pregnancy: General Information. You can also speak to your doctor with any questions or concerns. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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