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Possibility Of Having An STD Or UTI From Sex?

Published: November 12, 2014
Dear Possibility Of Having An STD Or UTI From Sex?,

I had sex for the first time yesterday while I was on my period we used a condom but I woke up this morning and my vagina burns I don't think I have an std or a unrinary track infection but is there a possibility that I do? And what do I do to take care of it


Dear Possibility Of Having An STD Or UTI From Sex?,

TeenHealthFX would like to start with some general information about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and urinary tract infections (UTIs). If someone is ever concerned that they may have transmitted an STD or that they may have a UTI, it is important to schedule an appointment with a doctor right away so that the doctor can assess the situation, give an accurate diagnosis and provide whatever treatment may be needed.

The type of treatment used if someone has been diagnosed with an STDs depends on what the particular STD is. STDs caused by bacteria are usually easier to treat, while STDs that are viral infections can be managed, but not always cured. Antibiotics may be used for STDs such as gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. Antiviral drugs may be used with diseases such as herpes and HIV. Antiviral drugs can help to manage these infections, but they do not cure them and it is still possible to pass these STDs onto sexual partners.  

Treatment for UTIs typically involves a prescription from a doctor for antibiotics.

As for your particular situation, anything is possible, but if you practiced safer sex by using a condom it is unlikely that you transmitted an STD. It is also possible that you have a UTI, but unlikely that this sexual encounter would have resulted in a UTI and you would have become symptomatic so quickly. What is most likely is that the burning you are experiencing is connected to your first time having sex – whether because of your hymen stretching, too much friction during sex, or possibly your partner not being gentle enough during penetration.

There can be some discomfort for females the first time they have sex. According to Planned Parenthood: “Some women have pain and bleeding the first time they have vaginal sex (penis-in-vagina) or fingers inserted into their vaginas. This happens because some people naturally have more of a hymen than others. If it doesn't get better after the first time, women can slowly stretch the tissue with their fingers over time to make it less painful. In rare cases, a doctor may have to open a woman's hymen. If you're worried about your hymen or have pain during sex, talk with your doctor.”

Too much friction (and not enough lubrication) can also cause irritation for both women and men.

While TeenHealthFX thinks it is unlikely to be an STD or UTI, please know that we can’t know for sure what is causing this burning. If it is causing you concern, we recommend speaking to your doctor about it. Your doctor will be able to give an accurate diagnosis and recommend any treatment (if necessary). Your doctor can also answer any questions you may have about safer sex. It is important for you to use condoms each and every time you have sex to help protect against the transmission of STDs and unwanted pregnancies. Your doctor can also let you know if it would be wise to be on a back-up method of birth control as well, such as the pill or birth control shot.

For more information on issues connected with sexual health and safer sex, check out the links in our Resource of the Month, Planned Parenthood Resources on Safer Sex.

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

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