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On the Pill, But My Period is 40 Days Late

Published: March 14, 2018
Dear TeenHealthFX,

Hi I've been on the pill constantly for over 2 years now. However, I've not had my period since the 3rd-7th of January. It could just be my pill being the pill. But I am 40 days late and during last month I had cramps that were so subtle. Not uncomfortable, just subtle and without bleeding. Now, I wasn't worried until I joined a period tracker today and it told me I was 40 days late. So... Can I have thoughts please?

Signed: On the Pill, But My Period is 40 Days Late

Dear On the Pill, But My Period is 40 Days Late ,

You stated that you utilize the birth control pill. When used properly, the pill is 99% effective. In order to increase effectiveness, it should be taken at the same time each day.  

FX understands that life gets busy, and it can be hard to remember to take your birth control pill every day. You may want to try setting a recurring alarm that reminds you to take your pill. It does not matter what time of day you take the pill, just as long as it is consistent. You can also utilize Planned Parenthood's Spot On App, a period tracker that lets you track both your period and any birth control method that affects it.  

Utilizing continuous birth control may cause your period to occur about four times per year, with occasional spotting in between periods. Other reasons why period may be delayed and/or absent include: 

  • Stress
  • Dietary changes
  • Weight fluctuation
  • Exercise   

 

Being that your period is 40 days late, TeenHealthFX suggests you schedule an appointment with your primary care physician and/or gynecologist. Your provider of choice can help you identify the cause of your fluctuated period. This appointment is a great time to inquire about other available birth control methods, which may better fit your needs.  

If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. A Planned Parenthood health center is a good option if you have concerns about cost or confidentiality issues. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.  

Lastly, you did not state if you are sexually active. TeenHealthFX recommends that all sexually active teenagers use condoms every time they have sexual intercourse. Condoms are the only form of birth control that can protect from sexually transmitted infections, and should be used in addition to another form of birth control for best protection.    

FX recommends reading the following resources for additional information:

Signed: TeenHealthFX

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