Can Your Hymen Break By Being Fingered?

Published: July 09, 2014
Dear Can Your Hymen Break By Being Fingered?,

Is it normal for someone to have there cherry popped by being fingered? and is it meant to hurt a little bit? also will it make it easier for him to finger me now?


Dear Can Your Hymen Break By Being Fingered?,

For our readers who may not know, having your “cherry popped” is a slang term that usually refers to the breaking of the hymen. (The hymen is a piece of tissue that lines the vaginal opening and that has an opening that allows menstrual blood to pass through). Some might also use this term of having your “cherry popped” to refer to losing one’s virginity, although losing one’s virginity and breaking the hymen are not the same thing, as described below.

Inserting an object into the vagina, including a finger, can cause this to happen and sometimes it can hurt a bit or cause some bleeding. Once the hymen has been stretched there should generally not be continued pain or bleeding during subsequent acts of penetration. FX would also like to say that while the experience can cause some pain, it should not feel excruciatingly painful. And you are always free to tell your partner to stop whatever he/she is doing if you ever feel in pain or uncomfortable in any way.  

Planned Parenthood offers the following information the hymen:

The hymen is a thin, fleshy tissue that stretches across part of the opening of the vagina.

The hymen can be stretched open the first time a girl has vaginal sex, which might cause some pain or bleeding. And despite what you may have heard, the hymen cannot grow back once it's been stretched open.

Some people, and some cultures, believe that a woman whose hymen has been stretched open is no longer a virgin. But having a hymen and being a virgin are not the same thing. There are other ways that a hymen can be stretched open, by inserting something into the vagina (like a tampon or a finger) riding a bicycle, or doing sports. And some girls are born with so little hymenal tissue that it seems like it was never there.

If you have any further questions or concerns, you can always speak to your doctor. If you don't have a doctor and live in northern New Jersey, you can call the Adolescent/Young Adult Center for Health at 973-971-5199 for an appointment with an adolescent medicine specialist or contact your local teen health center or Planned Parenthood. You can also contact your insurance company for a list of in-network providers.

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